A mid 19th century  Collodion wet plate  process portrait of a gentleman
A mid 19th century  Collodion wet plate  process portrait of a gentleman
A mid 19th century  Collodion wet plate  process portrait of a gentleman
A mid 19th century  Collodion wet plate  process portrait of a gentleman
A mid 19th century  Collodion wet plate  process portrait of a gentleman
A mid 19th century  Collodion wet plate  process portrait of a gentleman

A mid 19th century Collodion wet plate process portrait of a gentleman

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The wet collodion process was a photographic process used to produce a negative. It was invented by F. Scott Archer (1813–1857) in 1848.  It was most from 1855 to about 1881, it gradually displaced both the daguerreotype and calotype processes (a process involving both a negative and a positive, introduced by William Henry Fox Talbot in 1841). Wet-collodion-on-glass negatives were valuable  because the transparency of the glass produced a high resolution of detail in both the highlights and shadows of the resultant prints.  Furthermore the exposure times were shorter than those for the daguerreotype , ranging from a few seconds to a few minutes, depending on the amount of light available. In its original frame.

 Measuring: 11 cm x 12cm

British, mid 19th century